Author Archives: Eric Brunsell

A Professional Development Approach to the NGSS

Today’s Guest Blogger is author Eric Brunsell, an Associate Professor of Science Education in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction and Coordinator of the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning at the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Recently … Continue reading

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Website Wednesday!

— The Scientific Process Berkeley’s Understanding Science website is a great resource for learning more about the process of science.  The resource goes much deeper than the standard “PHEOC” model of the scientific method by emphasizing peer review, the testing … Continue reading

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Student blogs replace worksheets

Blogs provide a great way to extend the classroom beyond your 45 minute class period.  They can be used in a variety of ways to spark discussion and student research.  Chris Ludwig, a high school science teacher in Colorado, wrote … Continue reading

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Teaching resources for the Japanese earthquake and tsunami

The devastating earthquake and tsunami in Japan is on the minds of all of us, including our students. The event and aftermath is tragic and the continuing nuclear emergency is a reminder of how fragile society can be. As educators, … Continue reading

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Video analysis

Video analysis is a powerful tool to help physics students understand motion and other phenomena. For example, in this video by Dale Basler (physics teacher and co-host of Lab Out Loud), students can analyze the speed and position time graph … Continue reading

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The brains behind Watson

Whenever we talk about preparing kids for the future, we usually include collaboration and teamwork as a valuable skill. Our students also need to realize that science is not conducted by individuals in isolation. Successful scientists and engineers must be … Continue reading

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The genius of Watson

“She’s afraid that if she leaves, she’ll become the life of the party.” —Groucho Marx What does this phrase mean? Is it funny? ? Don’t you have to be at the party in order to be the life of it? … Continue reading

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Flipping your classroom

February’s Science 2.0 column focuses on how you can transform your classroom by using video lectures. Check out these videos by two of the pioneers of this approach: [youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uHK_a9SuTIk[/youtube] [youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2H4RkudFzlc[/youtube] More videos on flipping your classroom are available here. Additional … Continue reading

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Physics videos

December’s Science 2.0 includes a brief example of how Dale Basler (physics teacher and co-host of Lab Out Loud) creates his own videos for use in his physics classroom.  Here are a few examples: Bobber Meets Roundabout from Dale Basler … Continue reading

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Micronaut

From January’s Science 2.0 column: Picture This Assessment “I have often used microscopic images of everyday objects as warm-up exercises to start class, and to get kids involved in making observations and asking questions,” says John Burk, a ninth-grade physics … Continue reading

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