Author Archives: Martin Horejsi

Measuring Murphy’s Law with the Vernier Go Direct Acceleration Sensor

On the 4th of July this year,  a fitting date, America lost a true hero whom many people had never heard of, namely Robert Gilliland. Bob Gilliland was the chief test pilot and first person to fly the iconic SR-71 … Continue reading

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Learning Visualized with the Vernier Go Direct Hand Dynamometer

Collecting real-time data is important in science and science education, but it also presents a wonderful opportunity to learn about graphing and data visualization in general. It also provides an inspection into what learning actually looks like. I’ve used the … Continue reading

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Vernier Structures and Materials Tester: An Engineering Marvel To Test Student's Engineering Marvels

Back in 1986, David Vernier wrote a book titled “How to Build a Better Mousetrap: And 13 other science projects using the Apple II.” The premise of the book was to use software, hardware, and materials to construct what David … Continue reading

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The Go Direct SpectroVis Plus Spectrophotometer: Listening to Plants (Part 2)

Continuing the story of the Vernier Go Direct SpectroVis Plus Spectrophotometer, we will now apply its power it for a more traditional use; to inspect the transmission and absorption of fluid or a material suspended in a fluid. And that fluid … Continue reading

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The Vernier Go Direct SpectroVis Plus Spectrophotometer: A picture is worth 570 wavelengths (Part 1)

Of all the cool things invented by the universe, light is one of the most amazing. It solves all kinds of problems, can travel great distances with little effort, and its very existence has become possibly the greatest metaphor ever. And on … Continue reading

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The Vernier Go Direct Sound Sensor: See Sounds in a New Light (Bluetooth)

As much as I loved field trips with my students, I found the bus rides to be excessively stressful. It wasn’t because of the teacher responsibilities or the student behavior, but because of the noise. The volume and diversity of … Continue reading

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Fire Air Dephlogisticated and the Vernier Go Direct Wireless Oxygen Sensor

Oxygen is one of those very cool elements that can both save a life and kill whether in absence or abundance. Oxygen is necessary for life as we know it, but yet it oxidizes one of the most common elements … Continue reading

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Wild Spirits: Measuring Life and Death with the Pasco Wireless CO2 sensor

A student once asked me why if carbon dioxide is so much heavier than air, how come the lower atmosphere doesn’t become thick with CO2 and kill everything? “Umm, well…because it…umm…doesn’t?” The student then asked if I was going to … Continue reading

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The Vernier Go Direct Motion Detector: A Modern Twist on a Timeless Design

Vernier Software and Technology has introduced the next generation of its ultrasonic motion detector. While the gold circle sensor portion looks much like it’s previous five generations, the self-contained battery power source, the cubic form factor and most importantly the … Continue reading

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The Pasco Wireless Weather Station: Like having your own weather satellite

For almost 2000 years, Aristotle’s ideas about weather were the industry standard. Although our hindsight confirmed that many of the theories Aristotle put forth in his work Meteorologica were in error, the depth and breath of his observations and inferences … Continue reading

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